7 shining Mizzou moments under coach Warren Powers | Mizzou Sports News | stltoday.com – STLtoday.com Leave a comment

Under coach Warren Powers, Missouri football achieved some of the greatest upsets in program history. 
Powers, who died on Tuesday at the age of 80, had a 46-33-3 record as head coach from 1978-1984.
We look back at the Post-Dispatch original coverage from the biggest wins of the Powers era.
Earl Gant runs for 6 yards before being stopped by Notre Dame.
The Missouri Tigers ushered in the football coaching era of Warren Powers  in a manner that will leave them hard put to come up with an encore. They beat national champion Notre Dame!
The stunner was not only that they upset the team that was supposed to beat them by 17 points at home, but even more the way they went about it. They blanked the supposedly explosive national champions 3-0.
It was the first time Notre Dame had been shut out at home since Michigan did it in 1960. It was the first time the Irish had been shut out anywhere in 131 games – or since they were held to a 0-0 tie at Miami in 1965.
The only points put on the board In 60 minutes of brutal football under conditions of intense heat came off the toe of Jeff Brockhaus, a 6-foot-3 sophomore from Brentwood. His 33-yard field goal game with 12 minutes 50 seconds remaining in the game and sailed just inside the left upright. The heat was so extreme that 200 paying customers had to be treated at the stadium’s first aid station.
Back on the Mizzou campus, the goal posts came tumbling down after the Tigers win in Lincoln. Post-Dispatch file photo.
Wild? Certainly, the University of Missouri’s football game at Nebraska was that. It opened with a bang and then got Wilder and Wilder. James Wilder, that is.
The sophomore running back from Sikeston, Mo., scored four touchdowns as the Missouri Tigers, 13-point underdogs, stunned the second-ranked and Orange Bowl-bound Nebraska Cornhuskers, 35-31.
The upset not only took some of the juice out of the Orange Bowl but sent Mizzou smiling into the postseason bowl-game picture. After the Big Eight Conference triumph before a red-clad crowd of wilted Nebraskans, the 7-4 Tigers accepted a Liberty Bowl berth against Louisiana State (6-3) Dec. 23 in Memphis.
They called Nebraska’s 35-31 victory over Oklahoma in 1971 the Game of the Century. This one was every bit as exciting, so it was fitting that the game should end in the same score. This time, though, the Cornhuskers were on the short end.
Vincent DePaul Draddy, board chairman of the National Football Foundation and hall of fame, is flanked by Robert Dugas, left, of Louisiana state and Christopher Garlich, of Mizzou before the 1978 Liberty Bowl. AP photo
Missouri’s defense forced four interceptions and a fumble, and James Wilder, Earl Gant and Kellen Winslow each contributed touchdowns ast the Tigers built a 20-3 lead at halftime and cruised to the Liberty Bowl victory.
The Tigers finished the season 8-4 against the nation’s toughest schedule.
Mizzou’s Norman Goodman sacks South Carolina quarterback Garry Harper.
It seemed as if every time the South Carolina Gamecocks laid down an ace, the Missouri Tigers trumped it. So in the end, it was not surprising that the Tigers raked all the silver off the table and carried it home with them. That was the story of the Hall Of Fame Bowl in which the Tigers posted a 24-14 victory and, except for the opening minutes of the first and third quarters, seemed to be in complete control.
The following morning. Coach Warren Powers checked out of the Plaza Hotel South burdened with the big silver football that is emblematic of the Hall Of Fame Bowl championship. Phil Bradley, his slim junior quarterback from Macomb, III., clutched an equally big silver bauble, emblematic of his Most Valuable Player selection. Linebacker Eric Berg, senior from Rolla, Mo., had an arm locked around another monstrous prize this one proclaiming Eric to be the outstanding defensive player of the game.
Warren Powers was jumping for joy as George Shorthose ran past the Oklahoma defenders. 
Eight years and a numbing progression of losses against elite visitors had passed since Faurot Field was the site of such pandemonium. Not since a 13-12 victory over second-ranked Nebraska in 1973 had a University of Missouri performance generated the tumult that accompanied the Tigers’ 19-14 football victory over Oklahoma.
The Sooners Jinx, a phenomenon that spanned 12 years, was dead.
Students dashed madly from their seats as the final seconds expired and massed behind security guards who were woefully outnumbered. Their call to action was to have been the horn that sounded from the stadium scoreboard, but it was never heard, muffled as it was by the roar of those from the crowd of 67,364 who had remained in the stands. The initial focus of their surge onto the playing field was their team, the first Mizzou squad to defeat Oklahoma since the Tigers’ Orange Bowl squad of 1969 won here, 44-10. 
Jeff Gaylord (shown here against Oklahoma) was a force in the middle of the Mizzou defense.
Sophomore walk-on Bob Lucchesi kicked a record-tying four field goals and Missouri’s nationally ranked defense contained celebrated Southern Mississippi quarterback Reggie Collier as the Tigers defeated the Golden Eagles, 19-17, in the Tangerine Bowl.
Missouri All-America defensive tackle Jeff Gaylord was named the game’s most valuable player after Missouri’s defense limited Collier to 70 yards of offense. Collier, the first quarterback in National Collegiate Athletic Association history to rush and pass for more than 1,000 yards each in a season, ran for just 16 yards in 20 carries and completed only five of 17 passes for 54 yards. “Stopping a guy like Collier is the type of challenge we like,” Gaylord said. “We’ve got the best defensive line in the country when everybody wants to play like they can.” 
Warren Powers gets the victory ride over after a 1983 upset of Oklahoma. Post-Dispatch photo
Bummer.! Sooners.
Remember those swashbuckling Oklahoma football teams of the past?
The Boomer-variety of Sooners that trampled all pretenders in October and November and then packed their bags for the Florida coast come December?  Hoist one to their memory, then, because the Missouri Tigers officially dragged Oklahoma back into the Big Eight Conference Pack with’ a10-0 victory.
“It’s not like it used to be,” Mizzou defensive coordinator Mark Heydorff said. “Before, Oklahoma would just show up and our guys would say, ‘Uh, oh,’ they’ve got an OU on their helmet,’ and that’s it.”
Lining up this year with a freshman tackle and a running-back-turned-linebacker and a walk-on cornerback just to mention a few of the sundry no-names, a Mizzou team that has been trying to shake the stigma of a home loss to East Carolina proved physically superior to the 11th-ranked Sooners.
All this before a regional television audience and a host of bowl scouts, not to mention a crowd of 57,133 that for the first time since the Tigers upset the Sooners here two years ago made up with spirit what it lacked in numbers. Suffice it to say Athletic Director Dave Hart gladly will foot the bill for a couple of sets of new goalposts.
Dave Matter brings you the latest updates from the Mizzou sports scene.

Tigers are back to .500 but open as 39-point underdogs at No. 1 Georgia on Saturday.

Powers, who won 46 games at MU from 1978-84, had Alzheimer’s disease. 

Senior running back explodes for career-high 254 rushing yards in 37-28 win in Nashville. 

Freshman from East St. Louis fills in for Bazelak on final two drives at Vanderbilt.

Drinkwitz closes Tuesday practice, needs to see how week unfolds before deciding if Cook or Macon — or both? — need to replace Bazelak in Athens.

Starting quarterback dealing with soft tissue injury suffered at Vanderbilt.

Tigers quarterback believes he’s diagnosed the problem that’s led to six interceptions in his last four games as Mizzou heads to Vanderbilt.

Luther Burden’s recent commitment is MU’s latest step to build a talent base that can compete with Georgia, Florida. 

Coordinated by Kansas City’s Dan Lanning, the Bulldogs’ defense has demoralized opponents, holding teams to just 6.6 points per game, the best mark in the country. 

Here’s everything Missouri coach Eli Drinkwitz said after the Tigers’ 37-28 victory over Vanderbilt.
Warren Powers gets the victory ride over after a 1983 upset of Oklahoma. Post-Dispatch photo
Back on the Mizzou campus, the goal posts came tumbling down after the Tigers win in Lincoln. Post-Dispatch file photo.
Earl Gant runs for 6 yards before being stopped by Notre Dame.
Mizzou’s Norman Goodman sacks South Carolina quarterback Garry Harper.
Jeff Gaylord (shown here against Oklahoma) was a force in the middle of the Mizzou defense.
Warren Powers was jumping for joy as George Shorthose ran past the Oklahoma defenders. 
Vincent DePaul Draddy, board chairman of the National Football Foundation and hall of fame, is flanked by Robert Dugas, left, of Louisiana state and Christopher Garlich, of Mizzou before the 1978 Liberty Bowl. AP photo
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